Let's Not Do That Again by Grant Ginder

With each passing day, Americans seem to grow more politically divided than ever. Gone are the days of reaching across the aisle. Coming together for a common good is all but finished. No, these days the division is the point of it all. American politics has devolved into a tic for tac system that thrives on outrage at the actions of the other side. Yes, that outrage is often warranted, but it leaves the political system broken nonetheless. It is inevitable that this disconnect would make its way into our personal lives. I know many family members whom I don't see eye to eye with. It is this political/personal conflict that drives the action in author Grant Ginder's latest novel Let's Not Do That Again. 

Nancy Harriman is running for the US Senate. She's a career politician who has spent years in the public spotlight. She began her illustrious political life as the wife of a US congressman. After his sudden and untimely death, an incident that she continues to claim she had absolutely nothing to do with, Nancy inherited his seat. Now she's risking the comfort of that House of Representative position by going for broke and running for a coveted Senate seat. Winning would bring a much-needed majority to her liberal party and mark a pinnacle in her already groundbreaking career. Late in the campaign cycle, what looked like a sure-fire win is starting to look less certain. Her opponent is gaining traction and is leaving Nancy and her advisers scrambling to make up ground. With so much on the line, Nancy can't afford any missteps. 

Nick and Greta Harriman have strict instructions not to screw things up. They're used to it at this point. As the grown children of a US Congresswoman, they know they have to toe the line. Nick has always had a great relationship with his mother. He's a literature professor who is currently working on a musical based upon the life of Joan Didion. Being the gay son of a liberal politician has only helped prove his mother's passion for the social issues that her constituents care about. Greta has been less politically useful. She's smart and beautiful, but completely unmotivated to achieve anything. She spends her days working as a salesperson at the local Apple Store, perfectly content with doing nothing more. It comes as a shock to both Nick and Nancy when they see video footage out of Paris of an extremist protestor throwing a bottle of champaign into a bistro window. It isn't just the violent passion of the protest that goes against everything Nancy politically stands for, but the fact that the woman in question is none other than Greta! Nancy sends Nick to Paris to sort things out by saving his mother's campaign and his sister before it is too late. 

Let's Not Do That Again sees Grant Ginder write a novel that wears many hats. It is at times a searing political satire in the same vein as Veep or Parks and Recreation. Ginder relishes in showing political ineptitude, cynicism, and all-around disfunction. He dares to show the farcical side of politics,  a piece of the puzzle that is easy to forget about amongst the more serious and often damning revelations that have come out of our government in recent years. At other times, Ginder draws from the rich tradition of tightly wound political thrillers. Beneath the humor of his novel is the story of an intricate political campaign and the people working for and against it. To me, the book is at its best when it wears the hat of intimate family drama. Ginder's characters each stand on their own as fully thought out people. The relationships between mother and children, siblings, and young adults dating each other help to drive the action of the novel while grounding it in reality. In the deft hands of Grand Ginder, these elements come together to form a novel that is humorous, timely, and deeply affecting. Let's Not Do That Again is a novel for this time, of this time, and a book that will ultimately stand the test of time. 

Thanks to the publisher for providing me with a copy of this novel to review!

For more information visit the author's website, Amazon, and Goodreads

(2022, 18)

This entry was posted on Thursday, May 5, 2022 and is filed under ,,,,,,,,,. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response.

8 Responses to “Let's Not Do That Again by Grant Ginder”

  1. Political thrillers can be tough to read right now. We're already over saturated and truth has become stranger than fiction but it sounds like the author balanced everything really well here.

    Karen @For What It's Worth

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    1. The thriller elements of this one aren't the main part. Think of it more as a family drama that takes place around the politics.

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  2. If there's anything more complicated than politics, it's family! I don't usually read a lot of books like this, but I'm intrigued by this one. Great review, Ethan! :)

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    1. The dichotomy between family and politics makes for quite the entertaining read!

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  3. I've been watching some political thrillers on netflix. I kind of like them now so I might have to give this a look.

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    1. This would be a nice intro as it only has elements of political thrillers without being full on part of the genre.

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  4. I'm not much into politics (in real life or in fiction), but I do like intimate family dramas. I might have to check this one out, especially if it's done with good humor.

    Susan
    www.blogginboutbooks.com

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    1. The combination of family drama and humor make this one well worth the read!

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